Book Review: The Space Race by Matthew Brenden Wood

Tweet With space travel becoming more common and private companies promising to one day send tourists into orbit, it’s easy to assume that travel to the moon and beyond was a goal much supported by Americans. But the drive to … Continue reading

Book Review: Robots and Drones by Mairghread Scott and Jacob Chabot

Tweet When I think of robots and drones, ancient Greece doesn’t come to mind. In fact, an early kind of robot called an automaton let Greek people drop in a coin to get water. In the 1600s Japan, a moveable … Continue reading

Book Review: Fly Girls by P. O’Connell Pearson

Tweet During World War II, people all over the U.S. were asked to pitch in to help the war effort. For women especially, this meant they got to do jobs they would not have been otherwise allowed to do. One … Continue reading

Book Review: Brazen by Pénélope Bagieu

Tweet Brazen: Rebel Ladies Who Rocked the World puts the spotlight on 29 women (or groups of women) from different times in history who pushed the boundaries for what women could do. In ancient Greece, Agnodice became a gynecologist at … Continue reading

Book Review: Eruptions and Explosions by Judy Dodge Cummings

Tweet Eruptions are a part of nature, while explosions often result from man-made mistakes. Judy Dodge Cummings highlights five outbursts that had major impact on the world in Eruptions and Explosions: Real Tales of Violent Outbursts, a title in the … Continue reading

Book Review: Playing Atari With Saddam Hussein by Jennifer Roy

Tweet Ali Fadhil was just an ordinary boy living in Basra, Iraq in 1991. He loved to play soccer with his brothers and his friends, he worried about school bullies, he spent a lot of time playing video games, and … Continue reading

Book Review: Tomb Raiders by Judy Dodge Cummings

Tweet Did you know that in the 1870s kidnappers planned to steal Abraham Lincoln’s body and hold it for ransom? Or that the people of New York rioted in 1778 to protest the practice of doctors stealing bodies from graves … Continue reading

Book Review: The Forbidden Schoolhouse by Suzanne Jurmain

Tweet In 1833 a white woman named Prudence Crandall opened a boarding school for “young Ladies and little Misses of Color” in Canterbury, Connecticut, setting off a firestorm of protest in her hometown that lasted until the school closed 18 … Continue reading

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